Falling upward

I never realized what an utterly relaxing exercise it is to lay on the ground on a clear day and to gaze at the sky. I discovered this completely by accident while living in Chicago in Savasana at the end of a yoga class along Lake Michigan. Normally, one closes their eyes in an effort to attain ultimate relaxation, but I couldn't take my eyes off of the sky. The sky above me seemed to sit still while moving at a break neck speed. Everyone and everything around me fell away and I instantly felt as if I was sinking into the sky. While I was transfixed, I was also unsettled - I became keenly aware of the concept of gravity and the feeling that what was tethering me to the ground was precarious, at best. Simply put, it was a great catalyst for gaining some perspective.

Last fall, I excitedly drove to Houston with the express purpose of seeing the James Turrell exhibition at MFAH. I had never experienced Turrell's work in person but was anticipating an immersive experience in color and space. Like looking at the sky from Savasana, one can sink into Turrell's work. It is hard to define where the work starts and where it ends. We were so captivated by the exhibition, we decided to visit the artist's permanent installation on the Rice University campus: Twilight Epiphany. Turrell's structure does the hard work for you - framing the sky into a little slice of perspective.  If you haven't experienced it yet, it's well worth the trip to Houston.

Twilight Epiphany, 2012 by James Turrell. Photo by Kim Tidwell, August 24, 2013

Twilight Epiphany, 2012 by James Turrell. Photo by Kim Tidwell, August 24, 2013